Recent college grads and healthcare: How will the Supreme Court decision affect your family?

Meg Martin
Associate editor
Public Insight Network
Demonstrators wait outside the Supreme Court Building on June 28. The court ruled the Affordable Care Act to be constitutional. (Photo: Kris Connor | Getty)

Demonstrators wait outside the Supreme Court Building on June 28. The court ruled the Affordable Care Act to be constitutional. (Photo: Kris Connor | Getty)The Supreme Court’s ruling:
National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius

Earlier post: Health care in limbo
Your turn: Is health care reform working for you? 

Recent college grads have found themselves squarely in the middle of the health care maelstrom. They’ve graduated at a time of high unemployment with few professional jobs available, and may find themselves in jobs without health insurance.

Earlier this year, the Associated Press reported that 53.6 percent  of bachelor’s-degree holders under 25 were unemployed or underemployed. That’s the highest rate since 2000, and it represents 1.5 million people.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Affordable Care Act, which allows parents to carry their children on their health insurance plans until they reach the age of 26. Before the Supreme Court’s ruling came down, we asked members of the Public Insight Network about how the health care law has affected them.

We heard over and over again from parents who had been able to keep their adult children on their health plan, beyond high school or college graduation.

[Read their stories at "Waiting on SCOTUS: Health care in limbo."]

Many echoed the experience of Christine Adams, who lives in Houston. She says she doesn’t see the Affordable Care Act as a sustainable solution, but she’s used the provision for covering two of her offspring:

“Our daughter was immediately kicked off our United Health Care plan when she graduated from college.  For one year she had to purchase health insurance on the individual market until the ACA mandated that our health insurance cover her until she turns 26.

“Our son will graduate from college next year. We are expecting to have to cover his health insurance also because young people are not getting employment with health insurance due to our economic recession/depression.”

So, we wonder: Has this provision affected you or your family? For recent graduates and their parents: What does the Supreme Court’s decision mean in your life?

Share your experience with us here.

Meg Martin Associate editor
Public Insight Network
Meg Martin is PublicInsightNetwork.org's associate editor. She joined the PIN crew in St. Paul, Minn., after five years in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Roanoke, Va., where she led the online/multimedia team at the Roanoke Times newspaper. She spent two years before that in St. Petersburg, Fla., at The Poynter Institute - first as a summer writing fellow and later as a fellow and editor at Poynter Online - but she'll always be a Pittsburgher at heart.